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Love and be confident about your products – Marianne Rose Valera

Marianne Rose Valera established Yuna’s in 2019; and the biz has been growing. “Focus on something that you are passionate about when starting a business,” she said. “You’ve got to love and be confident about your products.”

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Yuna’s was started around October 2019, with an initial capital of around PhP2,000, and only with baked mac and Korean chicken wings in the menu, recalled Marianne Rose Valera. 

But it was a field she was bound to enter. 

Marianne Rose noted that online businesses have been trending, and “I’ve been wanting to have a business but can’t think of a product to sell… until I got the idea of selling comfort foods.”

It helps, of course, that “aside from cooking, I love feeding people. I grew up cooking with my mom (who) taught me the basics of cooking. And I am a housewife with a two year old daughter. I am a nurse by profession but chose to be a hands-on mom, putting aside my career for a moment. I thought of using my extra time on this food business,” she said.

Now, her family inspires her to do good. “In this time of crisis, I thought I’m still lucky having this business. My husband works abroad but due to the pandemic, work has been temporarily halted leaving him with no salary for three months. This business helped us through financially.”

There remain challenges.

For instance, “I am running my business alone. Prep work and cooking are tiring especially if you work alone,” she said. 

Also, “I have a two-year-old daughter who’s being looked after by my older sister if I have to cook or go to the grocery store to get supplies.”

All the same, “it is just a matter of time management.”

But yes, Marianne Rose already reached ROI; and she said this is a “profitable venture.”

And for people who may want to also open their business, what tips can Marianne Rose give?

“Focus on something that you are passionate about when starting a business,” she said. “You’ve got to love and be confident about your products.”

Wanna grab the offerings of Yuna’s? Head to Yuna’s Facebook page.

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‘Don’t be afraid to start, or do it scared anyway’ – Zoe Kimberly Santos

Siblings Zoe Kimberly Santos and Paulyn Santos opened The Fifth Palate on July 12, 2020, with a startup capital of around PhP3,000 to PhP5,000. “You have to hold your vision/goal as real, love what you do, have faith/trust in your own product and the rest will follow.”

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Siblings Zoe Kimberly Santos and Paulyn Santos opened The Fifth Palate on July 12, 2020, with a startup capital of around PhP3,000 to PhP5,000. Offering (mainly) Japanese cuisine, the business started while the world was braving Covid-19, Zoe Kimberly said, but they were inspired by “small startup local businesses and frontliners (who are) being courageous and put themselves out there regardless of the uncertainty.”

Paulyn Santos

Surprisingly, they did not actually imagine they would be going into this field/line of work/line of business. “We wanted a cafe, a hostel, or to design furniture design,” Zoe Kimberly said, smiling. Not that they regret being in this field now, since “we love our current chosen field of business.”

The great thing is, in a span of three weeks, and even when they were just getting started and offering their products to friends, they already gained ROI. Yes, this is a profitable venture, she said, “especially since people nowadays are craving/looking for something new.”

There remain challenges.

For instance, “managing the business while working full time, marketing online, and making your products adapt to (different) tastes,” she said. To deal with these challenges, “we do some research about Asian cuisines, as well as how to market online. We study and apply what’s useful/beneficial to our business. My sister and I do shifting schedules (cooking, delivery, etc.) to ensure that we have time to run the business.”

That they’re in this for the long-term is a given, considering the success that The Fifth Palate is experiencing.

For people who may want to also open their business, what tips can Zoe Kimberly give?

“You have to hold your vision/goal as real, love what you do, have faith/trust in your own product and the rest will follow. If you don’t know where to start, look for something you are passionate about and start small. Eventually, it will grow into your dream business,” she said. “Don’t be afraid to start, or do it scared anyway. It’s all about the mindset and perception. Also, enjoythe process.”

Wanna try the offerings of ‘The Fifth Palate’? Head to Instagram: @wearefifthpalate.

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Put all your passion, effort to what you are doing – Mary Jannelle Parungao

“Make sure you put all your passion and effort to what you are doing,” Mary Jannelle Parungao – part owner of Tyo Paeng Nyo – said, adding that would-be business people should “accept suggestions and be open to comments, don’t be easily pulled down by negativities.”

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Tyo Paeng Nyo was established as a food biz on June 24, 2019, with a capital of around PhP50,000. It is worth noting, said Mary Jannelle Parungao, that there family actually had a somewhat similar business from 2003-2007; and though that closed, “we decided to come back with the same business concept.”

Why this line of business?

“If you’re going to ask us (family members) one by one, we may give different answers,” Mary Jannelle smiled. “But bottomline is: we love to cook/serve food.”

This was also always a dream of the family. In fact, “most of us are undergraduates, but we have different skills which we now use in making our dreams come true… inch by inch…”

There are challenges, Mary Jannelle admitted.

For instance, “when we started all over again, we had to look for the right people to help us start anew,” she said. But for her, “challenges are just tests to your patience and abilities.”

And yes, they have reached reached ROI.

In fact, “with the demand from our current clients, we decided to put up a physical store/restaurant.”

“We need to fight not just for ourselves but also for the people who are relying on us,” Mary Jannelle said.

And for people who may want to also open their business, what tips can Mary Jannelle give?

“Make sure you put all your passion and effort to what you are doing,” she said, adding that would-be business people should “accept suggestions and be open to comments, don’t be easily pulled down by negativities.”

Curious about the offerings of Tyo Paeng Nyo? Head to Facebook or Instagram; or text/call 632-8366-2905, 09178922112 or 09234466845.

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Turn your hobby into a biz – Gem Zapanta

When Gem Zapanta established “Put It In Paper” in 2017, with a start-up capital of PhP5,000, it was because of a hobby. But she made it work, earning ROI in just few transactions.

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When Gem Zapanta established “Put It In Paper” in 2017, with a start-up capital of PhP5,000, it was because of a hobby. 

“Journaling/crafting was my hobby and there were items I’d like to have but didn’t come cheap so I ventured into offering my crafting services and reselling stationery,” she said.

She was actually initially apprehensive entering this line of business. “I was brought up with the thinking there was no money in this field,” she said.

But inspired by her sons, she persevered, eventually not just getting back her capital, but earning profit.

Nowadays, Gem said the big challenge is completing tasks by the deadline. This could also affect creativity. Nonetheless, she said: “Deadlines are easy to face as I work with grace under pressure. For creative blocks, that’s quite hard to (face)… but I push myself into creating even if I’m not in the mood to create because this is where I get money to pay bills.”

Since she also engages her clients to ask them what they really want, it makes the tasks easier since Gem said she no longer has to create something from scratch.

And for people who may want to also open their business, what tips can Gem give? 

“Let’s admit (that) my industry is not essential, and with the pandemic right now, you need to be practical and realistic. Competition is brutal and logistics is a challenge. But if you really want to go into the world of stationeries and crafting, you need to find your niche, build your brand, target your audience and be consistent,” Gem ended.

Want to get in touch with “Put It In Paper”? DM via Instagram: @putitinpaper (https://www.instagram.com/putitinpaper/).

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