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GCheck these tips to spot phishing scams and protect yourself

Scammers have found creative ways to sneakily get these info so it’s important to expose them and  get to know their methods.

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Ever experience that moment when you get a text message early in the morning and you excitedly jump out of bed thinking it’s crush-laloo greeting you, only to find out it’s some random SMS with bad grammar asking for your personal details? That inis-factor you’re feeling for these scammers — yes we’ve all been there, we feel you!

It doesn’t just stop there though. Nowadays, with the convenience of being able to buy anything with just a pa-“mine” comment at a live selling session or order that flash sale item with a tap of our fingers, come new levels of scam tactics. A common one is called phishing, where scammers send fake SMS, Emails, or links designed to trick people into giving away sensitive information such as personal information, banking details, and passwords. 

Scammers are getting more and more creative that we have to be G to be informed about what’s going on. Knowing the different ways they work is the first step in protecting ourselves. We all give in to certain types of “budol” as we call it—wherein we willingly fall for irresistible discounts or all-in-one bundles, or when you know you don’t need a new phone case but you purchase it anyway because it’s cute. To buy your wants and needs is okay, especially that you’ve been working hard for it. What is not okay is when you get yourself into types of budol that actually robs you of all your hard-earned money.

Are you G to be protected? Here are some common phishing scams and ways to protect yourself especially as we enter the merriest season of the year:

A popular method for scammers is to pretend to be an authorized customer representative on different platforms by appropriating company logos and a person’s profile picture. In social media, this can happen if you post your complaints publicly. They send a direct message and pretend to offer help with your concern. In emails, they use what seem to look like official addresses and create a sense of urgency to pressure you into following the steps they have outlined, otherwise, you will lose access to your account or incur possible charges. While in SMS, they send suspicious messages and links that will prompt you to install an app or require you to input your MPIN or OTP for many reasons: you’ve won a contest, have expiring rewards to claim, or that you need to update your contact information. Sometimes they’ll even call you. 

How do you spot scammers? Start by checking the sender. Is the text or call from a random phone number? Does the email look credible or does it look like it came from a sketchy free platform? Always check the source. Second, did they send you a link? GCash, for example, will NEVER send you an email asking to click a link. Scammers have become clever to make sure they no longer have typos on their message alerts. They used to misspell words like GAcsh or replace letters with numbers like GC4sh, but they’ve leveled-up to replicating official web pages by using the same visuals or actual promos to phish details from users.

Their goal is to get your One Time PIN (OTP) so they can link their device to your account, and your MPIN so they can login. If they can’t get your MPIN, they will try to ask for more OTPs in order to reset your MPIN. If you’ve been saving money for your pending bills and you don’t want to wake up as a player in Squid Game, never give out your MPIN and the OTPs that you receive on your phones.

However, scammers have found creative ways to sneakily get these info so it’s important to expose them and  get to know their methods. Here are some examples:

  • Hiram mobile phone – they borrow your phone for a variety of excuses but their real intent is to request OTPs to be sent to your phone so they can reset the MPINs themselves without you knowing.
  • Shoulder surfing – from the name itself, they spy over your shoulder to steal personal information that might help them in hacking your account.
  • Live selling sessions – this usually happens to online sellers when they broadcast what’s on their phones. Scammers just need good timing to initiate the OTP, display it on your screen for all to see, and therefore compromise your account.

If you find yourself on the receiving end of any of these suspicious instances or if you have concerns with any of the GCash services, the best way to address them is through the Help Center accessible within the app only.

The Christmas season and mega-sales online are happening soon so it’s important to remember this GChecklist: 

(1) check the sender or credibility of any website where you are being redirected 

(2) never share your MPIN or OTP

(3) only do actions within the GCash app. 

Once you tick off everything on this list, make sure you’re G to share this so your friends and family can protect themselves, too. For your holiday hauls, don’t forget: magpa-budol wisely!
For more information, visit gcash.com.  

BizNews

Robot-phobia could exacerbate hotel, restaurant labor shortage

Having a higher degree of robot-phobia was connected to greater feelings of job insecurity and stress – which were then correlated with “turnover intention” or workers’ plans to leave their jobs.

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Using more robots to close labor gaps in the hospitality industry may backfire and cause more human workers to quit, according to a Washington State University study.

The study, involving more than 620 lodging and food service employees, found that “robot-phobia” – specifically the fear that robots and technology will take human jobs – increased workers’ job insecurity and stress, leading to greater intentions to leave their jobs. The impact was more pronounced with employees who had real experience working with robotic technology. It also affected managers in addition to frontline workers.

The findings were published in the International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management.

“The turnover rate in the hospitality industry ranks among the highest across all non-farm sectors, so this is an issue that companies need to take seriously,” said lead author Bamboo Chen, a hospitality researcher in WSU’s Carson College of Business. “The findings seem to be consistent across sectors and across both frontline employees and managers. For everyone, regardless of their position or sector, robot-phobia has a real impact.”

Food service and lodging industries were hit particularly hard by the pandemic lockdowns, and many businesses are still struggling to find enough workers. For example, the accommodation workforce in April 2024 was still 9.2% below what it was in February 2020, according to US Bureau of Labor Statistics. The ongoing labor shortage has inspired some employers to turn to robotic technology to fill the gap.

While other studies have focused on customers’ comfort with robots, this study focuses on how the technology impacted hospitality workers. Chen and WSU colleague Ruying Cai surveyed 321 lodging and 308 food service employees from across the US, asking a range of questions about their jobs and attitudes toward robots. The survey defined “robots” broadly to include a range of robotic and automation technologies, such as human-like robot servers and automated robotic arms as well as self-service kiosks and tabletop devices.

Analyzing the survey data, the researchers found that having a higher degree of robot-phobia was connected to greater feelings of job insecurity and stress – which were then correlated with “turnover intention” or workers’ plans to leave their jobs. Those fears did not decrease with familiarity: employees who had more actual engagement with robotic technology in their daily jobs had higher fears that it would make human workers obsolete.

Perception also played a role. The employees who viewed robots as being more capable and efficient also ranked higher in turnover intention.

Robots and automation can be good ways to help augment service, Chen said, as they can handle tedious tasks humans typically do not like doing such as washing dishes or handling loads of hotel laundry. But the danger comes if the robotic additions cause more human workers to quit. The authors point out this can create a “negative feedback loop” that can make the hospitality labor shortage worse.

Chen recommended that employers communicate not only the benefits but the limitations of the technology – and place a particular emphasis on the role human workers play.

“When you’re introducing a new technology, make sure not to focus just on how good or efficient it will be. Instead, focus on how people and the technology can work together,” he said.

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Tech & Innovation

AI can enhance flexibility, efficiency for customer service centers

AI is a valuable asset, so long as it’s used properly, though these organizations shouldn’t rely on it exclusively to guide their strategies.

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Whenever you call a customer service contact center, the team on the other end of the line typically has three goals: to reduce their response time, solve your problem and do it within the shortest service time possible.

However, resolving your problem might entail a significant time investment, potentially clashing with an overarching business objective to keep service duration to a minimum. These conflicting priorities can be commonplace for customer service contact centers, which often rely on the latest technology to meet customers’ needs.

To pursue those conflicting demands, these organizations practice what’s referred to as ambidexterity, and there are three different modes to achieve it: structural separation, behavioral integration and sequential alternation. So, what role might artificial intelligence (AI) systems play in improving how these organizations move from one ambidexterity mode to another to accomplish their tasks?

New research involving the School of Management at Binghamton University, State University of New York explored that question. Using data from different contact center sites, researchers examined the impact of AI systems on a customer service organization’s ability to shift across ambidexterity modes.

The key takeaway: it’s a delicate balancing act; AI is a valuable asset, so long as it’s used properly, though these organizations shouldn’t rely on it exclusively to guide their strategies.

Associate Professor Sumantra Sarkar, who helped conduct the research, said the study’s goal was to understand better how organizations today might use AI to guide their transition from one ambidexterity mode to another because certain structures or approaches might be more beneficial from one month to the next. 

“Customer service organizations often balance exploiting the latest technology to boost efficiency and, therefore, save money,” Sarkar said. “This dichotomy is what ambidexterity is all about, exploring new technology to gain new insights and exploiting it to gain efficiency.”

As part of the three-year study, researchers examined the practices of five contact center sites: two global banks, one national bank in a developing country, a telecommunication Fortune 500 company in South Asia and a global infrastructure vendor in telecommunications hardware.

While many customer service organizations have spent recent years investing in AI, assuming that not doing so could lead to customer dissatisfaction, the researchers found these organizations haven’t used AI to its full potential. They have primarily used it for self-service applications.

Some of the AI-assisted tasks researchers tracked at those sites included:

  • using AI systems to automatically open applications, send emails and transfer information from one system to another
  • approving or disapproving loan applications
  • providing personalized service based on customer’s data and contact history

Researchers determined that while it’s beneficial for customer service companies to be open to harnessing the benefits and navigating any challenges of AI systems as a guide to their business strategies, they should not do so at the expense of supporting quality professional development and ongoing learning opportunities for their staff.

Sarkar said that to fully utilize AI’s benefits, those leading customer service organizations need to examine every customer touchpoint and identify opportunities to enhance the customer experience while boosting the operation’s efficiency.

As a result, Sarkar said newcomers in this technology-savvy industry should learn how companies with 20 or 30 years of experience have already adapted to changes in technology, especially AI, during that time before forming their own business strategies.

“Any business is a balancing game because what you decide to do at the start of the year based on a forecast has to be revised over and over again,” Sarkar said. “Since there’s that added tension within customer service organizations of whether they want to be more efficient or explore new areas, they have to work even harder at striking that balance. Using AI in the right way effectively helps them accomplish that.”

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BizNews

Emojis make tourism advertising on social media more effective, appealing

The use of emojis in online messages about tourism destinations facilitates processing and reduces ambiguity, especially when the recipients encounter content with low levels of congruence.

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The use of congruent messages and emojis when promoting tourist destinations on social media leads to greater user attention. This strategy helps users to process the information effectively and reduces their cognitive effort. More specifically, the use of emojis in online messages about tourism destinations facilitates processing and reduces ambiguity, especially when the recipients encounter content with low levels of congruence.

This is according to a research – “The effect of online message congruence, destination-positioning, and emojis on users’ cognitive effort and affective evaluation” – that was published in the Journal of Destination Marketing & Management.

The study, which was carried out at the University of Granada’s Mind, Brain and Behaviour Research Centre (CIMCYC), consisted of an experiment using eye-tracking techniques on 60 users of the social network Facebook. These individuals underwent a series of experimental procedures in which the researchers manipulated the level of congruence between the messages of those posting and the users, the use or omission of emojis in the content, and the way in which the tourist destination was positioned in the media (natural environment, gastronomy, hotels, sun and beach).

The UGR research team, which includes Beatriz García Carrión, Francisco Muñoz Leiva, Salvador del Barrio García and Lucia Porcu, point out that the study “clearly illustrates the benefits in terms of the effectiveness of using congruent messages in marketing communications in general, and especially in digital communications via social media, as well as how the use of emojis contributes to improving users’ information processing, increasing their attention and reducing the cognitive effort involved. Moreover, congruent messages not only facilitate users’ information processing, but also improve their affective evaluation — a crucial aspect when it comes to making a decision on a tourist destination.”

The key findings included:

  • Importance of maintaining a high level of congruence in the information they convey through social media. As the researchers explain: “This involves systematically reviewing and managing comments across all communication channels to identify any comments that do not align with the destination’s desired positioning, with a view to mitigating potential negative effects.”
  • Pictorial representations (emojis) significantly enhance the overall comprehension of the information. However, the study did not find a significant impact of emojis on the formation of affective evaluations.
  • Tourism managers should focus on information related to the destination’s gastronomy and natural environment, rather than more conventional aspects such as sun and beach facilities or hotel offerings, as the former attract more attention and are perceived more favorably, even under low levels of congruence.

The research findings suggest a shift in the preferences of potential consumers towards more nature-based tourism. “Therefore, tourism managers should place greater emphasis on communicating aspects related to the environment and sustainability of the tourist destination in their social media posts, thereby reaping benefits in terms of visual attention and affective evaluations,” the researchers stressed.

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